Sunday, February 19, 2017

Dewey Studies Journal - Call for Papers

Call For Papers: 

Dewey Studies is pleased to invite submissions for publication in this peer-reviewed journal dedicated to furthering the vital philosophical work of John Dewey. For more information, please visit Dewey Studies at http://www.johndeweysociety.org/dewey-studies/


Aims and Scope: 

Dewey Studies is an online, open-access journal of the John Dewey Society dedicated to furthering understanding of John Dewey’s philosophical work and enlivening his unique mode of engagement with the vital philosophical questions of our time.

Dewey Studies welcomes articles engaging with Dewey’s philosophical interests, broadly understood—whether metaphysics, logic, aesthetics, philosophy of science, psychology, democratic theory, philosophy of culture, or a number of other fields.

We ask that authors whose works deal primarily with the philosophy of education consider instead submitting to one of the John Dewey Societies’ education focused journals: Education and Culture or The Journal of School and Society.

Dewey Studies seeks to publish articles that:

(1) Contribute to the ongoing exegesis and analysis of Dewey’s philosophical positions.
(2) Demonstrate how Deweyan resources can help resolve problematic situations: not only within the philosophical tradition, but more broadly as well.
(3) Situate Dewey as a significant figure within the history of philosophy (and history more broadly), by showing how he influenced and was influenced by others.
(4) Discuss the relationship between Dewey and American philosophy, especially American pragmatism.
(5) Appeal to the interests and needs of Dewey scholars.

Submission Guidelines: 

To submit a manuscript for publication, please send an email to:

Jared Kemling, Associate Editor jaredkemling@gmail.com

To submit a book review or inquire as to what books are available for review, please email:
Daniel Brunson, Reviews Editor daniel.brunson@morgan.edu

Your submission should:

(1) Conform to the aims and scope of the journal.
(2) Contain a cover letter as an attachment (.doc or google doc) with an abstract of the
article, as well as your contact information. The cover letter should be clearly labelled
with your name and article title, such as—DS Cover Letter: Your Name, Article Title.
(3) Contain your essay as an attachment (.doc or google doc), prepared for blind review, with
a clearly labelled title such as—DS Submission: Article Title.

Your essay should follow the following formatting guidelines:

(1) 5-8k words (preferably), submitted as a single paginated file.
(2) Follows the Chicago Manual of Style, with citations included as footnotes.
(3) Submissions should be in English. US and UK spellings are both acceptable, as long as
the essay is internally consistent.
(4) Double quotation marks should be used for quotes, with punctuation generally falling
inside the quotes (see the CMS for details).
(5) Single quotation marks should be used for quotes within quotes, or as scare quotes for
emphasis. Punctuation generally falls inside the quotes (see the CMS for details).
(6) Dewey Studies follows citation guidelines set by the Center for Dewey Studies, as follows
(adapted from the Center’s website):
     (a) Standard references to John Dewey's work are to the critical (print) edition, The
Collected Works of John Dewey, 1882-1953, edited by Jo Ann Boydston
(Carbondale and Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press, 1969-1991),
and published in three series as The Early Works (EW), The Middle Works (MW)
and The Later Works (LW). These designations are followed by volume and page
number. "LW 1.14," for example, refers to The Later Works, volume 1, page 14.
In order to ensure uniform citations of the critical edition, the pagination of the
pr int edition has been preserved in The Collected Works of John Dewey,
1882-1953: The Electronic Edition, edited by Larry A. Hickman (Charlottesville,
Virginia: InteLex Corp., 1996).
      (b) Sample Citation: John Dewey, The Collected Works of John Dewey, 1882-1953,
ed. by Jo Ann Boydston (Carbondale and Edwardsville: Southern Illinois
University Press, 1969-1991), LW 14:311.
      (c) After the initial citation of the Collected Works, it is acceptable for subsequent
citations to only feature the shorthand designation (i.e., LW 14:311).

Copyright of all published work remains with the author(s). As an open-access journal, we
encourage authors and readers to share our publications freely, with appropriate
acknowledgement. As a matter of standard academic practice, any subsequent print appearance
of a work published in Dewey Studies should acknowledge that prior publication.



Monday, December 12, 2016

The John Dewey Society and the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 2017 CFP

JOHN DEWEY SOCIETY at SAAP 2017: Call For Participation
The John Dewey Society calls for proposals for its panel on Creative Democracy: The Task Before Us in the Era of Clinton v. Trump, to be held at the annual meeting of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy (SAAP) at Birmingham, AL , March 16-18 2017.
What are the challenges to a vibrant and healthy democratic life? In an essay late in life, Creative Democracy – The Task Before Us, Dewey calls upon us to not take democratic life for granted. More than a political institution, Dewey sees democracy as dependent upon family, friendship, the economy, and other parts of the fabric of civil society.
Today, in many countries, institutions of democracy are being threatened by growing inequality, mistrust of the other, and poverty. It is a time to return to Dewey’s text to consider how democratic life can be fostered amidst these challenges.
The following topics are based on Dewey’s essay and are meant to prompt ideas about suitable papers, and not be prescriptive or exhaustive.

  • The meaning of democracy as a personal or individual way of life today;
  • The effects of globalization, information technologies and robotics on democratic institutions;
  • Failure of effective political representation in post-industrial democratic oligarchies;
  • The 2008 global economic downturn today’s democratic institutions;
  • The Big Lie, post-truth, and the media;
  • Creative directions for the U. S. two party system after Clinton v. Trump.
Please send proposals (500 words, maximum) to Leonard J. Waks, President, The John Dewey Society, at ljwaks@yahoo.com by midnight Eastern time, Friday, December 22, 2016.

Thursday, November 10, 2016

John Dewey Society Panel on Dewey and Philosophy: Creative Democracy – The Task Before Us in the Era of Clinton v Trump

CALL FOR PROPOSALS DEADLINE EXTENDED
John Dewey Society Panel on Dewey and Philosophy 2017:

Creative Democracy: The Task Before Us in the Era of Clinton v Trump

The John Dewey Society calls for paper proposals for its panel on Dewey and Philosophy (formerly called the Past Presidents’ Panel), to be held at its annual meeting, in conjunction with the American Educational Research Association meeting in San Antonio, Texas on April 27 – May 1, 2017.

After the election result of 2016 with Trump garnering 290 to Clinton's 228 of the electoral votes, and Clinton edging by Trump with 48% to 47% of the nation's popular votes, where do we stand as a democracy?  How do we define ourselves as a nation? What will the results of this election mean for the future of education, healthcare, retirement security, and other social programs that the United States as a community view as imperatives?

In short, what does this election reveal about the challenges every citizen faces in maintaining a vibrant and healthy democratic life? In an essay late in life, Creative Democracy – The Task Before Us[1], Dewey calls upon us to not take democratic life for granted. More than a political institution, Dewey sees democracy as dependent upon family, friendship, the economy, and other parts of the fabric of civil society. Today in many countries, institutions of democracy, in particular public schools, are challenged by growing inequality, mistrust of the other, and poverty. It is a time to return to Dewey’s text to consider how democratic life can be fostered amidst these challenges.

The following topics are based on Dewey’s essay and are meant to prompt ideas about suitable papers, and not be prescriptive or exhaustive:

  •        The effects of the global economic downturn starting in 2008 on today’s democratic institutions
  •        Climate change, environmental destruction, and democracy
  •        Creativity and democratic education
  •        The meaning of democracy as a personal or individual way of life today
  •        Democracy and leadership in education
  •        Democracy and education for peace
  •        Democracy and the two party system in the Age of Clinton v. Trump


Submit all proposals (prepared per instructions below) for individual papers via email with an attachment as a Word document. The DEADLINE for proposals has been EXTENDED to  midnight Pacific time Tuesday, November 12, 2016, via email to AG Rud, John Dewey Society president elect, Distinguished Professor, Washington State University, ag.rud@wsu.edu; Any questions - contact AG Rud directly via email.

Proposals accepted for presentation in this panel of the John Dewey Society will be notified by January 15, 2016. Full papers of up to 5000 words (excluding references done in APA style) will be due no later than April 3, 2017 for the discussant to prepare remarks.



Proposal Guidelines

Part 1 (submit in the body of your email message with the subject line JDS Proposal)

(1.) Title of your paper and theme your proposal addresses
(2.) Your name, title, institutional affiliation (if any)
(3.) Your address, phone, email
(4.) An abstract of up to 100 words

Part 2 (in an attached Word document with all identifying information removed for anonymous review)

(1.) Title of your paper
(2.) A descriptive summary of your paper (maximum length 1000 words), explaining your paper and its significance, especially in relation to the selected theme. List several references to place your contribution in the broader scholarly conversation.

About The John Dewey Society (http://www.johndeweysociety.org)

Founded in 1935, the purpose of the Society is to foster intelligent inquiry into problems pertaining to the place and function of education in social change, and to share, discuss, and disseminate the results of such inquiry.




[1] Dewey, J. (1939/1988). Creative democracy: The task before us. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), The later works of John Dewey, 1925-1953 (Volume 14: 1939-1941, Essays, pp. 225-231). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.

John Dewey Society Panel on Dewey and Philosophy: 2017 Topic: Creative Democracy – The Task Before Us Today

CALL FOR PROPOSALS:
John Dewey Society Panel on Dewey and Philosophy 2017:

Creative Democracy: The Task Before Us in the Era of Clinton v Trump

The John Dewey Society calls for paper proposals for its panel on Dewey and Philosophy (formerly called the Past Presidents’ Panel), to be held at its annual meeting, in conjunction with the American Educational Research Association meeting in San Antonio, Texas on April 27 – May 1, 2017.

After the election result of 2016 with Trump garnering 290 to Clinton's 228 of the electoral votes, and Clinton edging by Trump with 48% to 47% of the nation's popular votes, where do we stand as a democracy?  How do we define ourselves as a nation? What will the results of this election mean for the future of education, healthcare, retirement security, and other social programs that the United States as a community view as imperatives?

In short, what does this election reveal about the challenges every citizen faces in maintaining a vibrant and healthy democratic life? In an essay late in life, Creative Democracy – The Task Before Us[1], Dewey calls upon us to not take democratic life for granted. More than a political institution, Dewey sees democracy as dependent upon family, friendship, the economy, and other parts of the fabric of civil society. Today in many countries, institutions of democracy, in particular public schools, are challenged by growing inequality, mistrust of the other, and poverty. It is a time to return to Dewey’s text to consider how democratic life can be fostered amidst these challenges.

The following topics are based on Dewey’s essay and are meant to prompt ideas about suitable papers, and not be prescriptive or exhaustive:

  •        The effects of the global economic downturn starting in 2008 on today’s democratic institutions
  •        Climate change, environmental destruction, and democracy
  •        Creativity and democratic education
  •        The meaning of democracy as a personal or individual way of life today
  •        Democracy and leadership in education
  •        Democracy and education for peace
  •        Democracy and the two party system in the Age of Clinton v. Trump


Submit all proposals (prepared per instructions below) for individual papers via email with an attachment as a Word document. All proposals are due by midnight Pacific time November 15, 2016, via email to AG Rud, John Dewey Society president elect, Distinguished Professor, Washington State University, ag.rud@wsu.edu; Any questions - contact AG Rud directly via email.

Proposals accepted for presentation in this panel of the John Dewey Society will be notified by January 15, 2016. Full papers of up to 5000 words (excluding references done in APA style) will be due no later than April 3, 2017 for the discussant to prepare remarks.



Proposal Guidelines

Part 1 (submit in the body of your email message with the subject line JDS Proposal)

(1.) Title of your paper and theme your proposal addresses
(2.) Your name, title, institutional affiliation (if any)
(3.) Your address, phone, email
(4.) An abstract of up to 100 words

Part 2 (in an attached Word document with all identifying information removed for anonymous review)

(1.) Title of your paper
(2.) A descriptive summary of your paper (maximum length 1000 words), explaining your paper and its significance, especially in relation to the selected theme. List several references to place your contribution in the broader scholarly conversation.

About The John Dewey Society (http://www.johndeweysociety.org)

Founded in 1935, the purpose of the Society is to foster intelligent inquiry into problems pertaining to the place and function of education in social change, and to share, discuss, and disseminate the results of such inquiry.




[1] Dewey, J. (1939/1988). Creative democracy: The task before us. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), The later works of John Dewey, 1925-1953 (Volume 14: 1939-1941, Essays, pp. 225-231). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.

Challenges for Democracy: New Developments and Tendencies

Call for Abstracts

The John Dewey Society presents
The Third Annual


Dewey Through Generations Panel

In Creative Democracy – The Task Before Us Dewey reminds us that democracy should not be seen as a political machine which once it is set up would perpetuate its existence automatically. On the contrary, the very existence and health of our democracies depend on conditions which go beyond our immediate political institutions and which concern our family relations, our friendships, our economical organization, etc. In a time where our democratic institutions seem to be endangered by increasing structural inequality, globalization, economic crisis and the reemergence of xenophobic attitudes, we should return to the theoretical resources Dewey has to offer on these present challenges for our democracies.

Hence, in the DtG panel 2017 we propose to explore the following questions:

   
·     How are the latest developments in the democratic life of our societies to be critically assessed? What are the observable tendencies? Are there only reasons to worry or are there reasons also for hope in the recovery and deepening of democracy?
·     What have been the effects of the financial crash of 2008 for our democratic institutions and practices? What can we expect from the reforms brought about by current governments?
·     Are there economic alternatives to capitalism (not only classical, but also in its neoliberal form) which could work as better social foundations for democratic practice?    
·     How do global problems (climate change, wars and conflicts, etc.) affect our democracies? Should we see these global conditions as obstacles, as opportunities, or both?     


The Dewey Through Generations Panel was established in 2015 to highlight and support emerging Dewey inspired scholars and practitioners (including but not limited to graduate students) by bringing them into a dialogue with eminent scholars who reflect the best of Dewey's philosophical practice. One eminent Dewey scholar participates in a dialogue (as commentator/respondent) with the emerging scholar panelists. We are pleased to announce that this year’s Dewey Scholar will be Gregory Pappas (Texas A&M University). For an overview of Dr. Pappas’ scholarship see:

Submissions Due: November 15, 2016 (By 11:59 PM, CST)

Graduate students, student-professionals, and emerging scholars, may submit an abstract for the panel. The panel will include three papers/or projects (limited to 3000 words) and commentary by an invited Dewey scholar (limited to 1500 words).

Submit all abstracts (prepared per instructions below) via email with an attachment as an MSWord document. All proposals should be received on or before November 15, 2016, by Just Serrano at dtg@johndeweysociety.org.

Submission guidelines: Part 1 (submit in the body of your email message): (1) Title of your paper; (2) Your name, title/student status, institutional/professional affiliation (if any); (3) Your address, phone, and email; Part 2 (attaches as a MSWord document prepared for blind review): (1) Title of your paper/project; (2) An abstract and/or descriptive summary of your paper/project, explaining your work and its significance, especially in relation to the selected themes(s). All abstracts should be formatted according to Chicago or APA style, with a maximum length of 800 words excluding the title and references.

Please direct all questions to Just Serrano at justserrano@gmail.com. Abstracts accepted for presentation on this panel of the John Dewey Society will be notified by January 15, 2017. Final papers will be due April 2, 2017.